O'Sullivan Estate Lawyers LLP
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Posts tagged "Multi-jurisdictional estate planning"

Estate Plan "Health Check-Up" - Keeping up to Date with Recent Legal and Tax Changes

In both our August 2015 and March 2016 blog posts, we discussed the importance of frequently reviewing your estate planning documents, as personal and financial circumstances can constantly change. Failing to make necessary revisions to your estate planning documents may result in unintended consequences that do not accurately reflect your wishes, intentions and goals.

Navigating Multi-Jurisdictional Probate

In March of this year, I wrote about the complications which can arise in administering an estate of an individual who owns a vacation home in a U.S. state such as Florida or Arizona. In that blog, I discussed issues in estate administration which arise from the multi-jurisdictional location of assets and the requirements to obtain probate in different places. Another type of complication which can occur arises from the probate rules in other jurisdictions and the ways they differ from, and are not compatible with, the probate rules in Ontario.

Tax Reform Revealed: Will the U.S. Become the Best Next Tax Haven?

On April 26, 2017, with great fan-fare, the White House announced bold proposals for tax reform, the primary objective of which is to stimulate economic growth. These reforms could be a real game-changer if they succeed in creating new jobs, fuelling economic expansion, and making the U.S. more competitive - and dare I say it ...making America great again.

Multiple Taxation on Death: The Taxpayer's Nightmare

With increasing globalization of people and their assets, a growing and often hidden threat is multiple taxation on death. Different countries tax in different ways on death, and when those laws collide, the same assets can be exposed to double and even triple tax or more.

Start the New Year off on the Right Foot

As of today, according to the Gregorian calendar, we are just over one month away from ringing in the New Year. If you are already contemplating your New Year's resolution, we thought we would help out in this blog post by providing you with a shortlist of "thinking points" for your estate planning to help you start 2017 with your best foot forward. What follows are five recommendations gathered from our past year's blog posts to assist in getting your estate plan into even better shape. 

For Better or For Worse... Especially If You Move

There are many things that we think about and plan for when we move--furniture, movers, schools, utilities... I could go on and on. There are even more things that we plan for when we move to another jurisdiction-language, taxes, visas, driving laws... and so it goes. But one thing you might never think about if you move to another jurisdiction is the impact of the matrimonial regime of your new home on your estate plan. Matrimonial laws can have a major impact on your estate plan, and not knowing what those effects might be can make the difference between your estate plan working the way it was meant to and not.

Don't let cross-border properties turn into cross-border pains

Perhaps I should refrain from re-stating the obvious, but it bears repeating--we live in an increasingly global and mobile society, where people move from jurisdiction to jurisdiction with relative ease. And when we're not picking up and moving residences, we're travelling to foreign destinations and buying property, opening bank accounts or acquiring other assets there. Then there are inherited properties abroad, or property held before the move to Canada.

The Two Certainties: Death and (Foreign) Taxes

A failure to take into account taxes on death can often defeat an estate plan. It can result in a smaller estate being available for distribution and it can also result in some beneficiaries bearing a disproportionate amount of the estate's tax burden. While most estate plans take into account domestic taxes arising on death, such as income tax and probate tax, foreign taxes, however, are too often ignored even though a dollar of tax paid to a foreign government is no different than one paid to a domestic government.

New Developments in Interjurisdictional Incapacity Planning

With the arrival of fall, many readers may be preparing to escape the pending cold by travelling to warmer climates for extended stays. In our February 12, 2014 blog post we highlighted the potential concerns and practical issues if you become incapable of making either financial or personal care decisions (whether permanently or temporarily) while outside your 'home' jurisdiction, including if you have assets located there.

New EU Rules for Cross-Border Succession Now Apply from August 17, 2015

When a client dies leaving assets in more than one country, conflict of laws rules (also known as private international law or PIL rules) step in to help determine which country's law should govern succession of the estate. As outlined in our earlier blog post of July 16, 2013, to achieve more clarity and certainty, the European Union passed a law known as the Succession Regulation in July 2012. It is now fully operational in all EU member states as of August 17, 2015 (except in Denmark, the U.K. and Ireland, which decided to opt out).

We are a top-ranked and peer recognized firm, including Margaret O’Sullivan by Chambers Canada Guide 2017 and Chambers Canada High Net Worth 2017 as one of the top six private client lawyers in Canada:

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