Category: Family Law

Domestic Contracts to Protect Family Wealth: Unassailable or Not?

When family wealth is at stake, parents may wish to encourage their children to enter into a domestic contract with their partners. The purpose may include to protect significant gifts and inheritances, a home owned at date of marriage, or a family business. With divorce rates at an all time

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Putting the “Success” Back Into Succession Planning

One of the increasing challenges facing parents and other family members today is achieving success in their estate planning – passing on their wealth well. But how should we define “success”. From a professional viewpoint, much of estate planning focuses on ensuring a tax and cost-efficient transition of wealth to

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Medically Assisted Dying in Canada – An Update

In April 2017, the CBC reported that over 1,300 people in Canada have died with medical assistance since the Criminal Code was amended in 2016 to legalize medical assistance in dying (“MAID”). While this statistic points to the importance of MAID for many Canadians, the new legislation has not settled

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The New Normal: Assisting a Child with Buying a Home

A current trend in the increasingly expensive Canadian housing market is parents helping children or grandchildren and their spouses with a down payment or mortgage on a first home. In Ontario, about 35% of people buying homes now receive assistance from their relatives with a down payment and approximately 38%

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Keeping Things Up-To-Date

Putting estate planning documents in place can be a daunting task, but it does not end there. Estate planning is an organic process that requires ongoing attention and revision. Circumstances in your life will continue to change and your main objective is to ensure that your wishes and intentions are

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Cross-Canada Checkup: Property Rights on Marriage Breakdown and Death

Canadians are increasingly mobile within Canada. Employees are transferred and move with their families to another province, couples decide to retire in a province with a more moderate climate, or seniors decide to move to be closer to their children and grandchildren. But in changing jobs, lifestyle and family connections,

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